dennyjim: Hello

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dennyjim
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dennyjim: Hello

Post by dennyjim » Tue Jan 09, 2018 1:27 pm

Hi, I've just started with microprocessors. Just dipping my toe in the water but I have a few projects I'd like to try.
The STM32 seems like a great place to start. Here goes. Nothing ventured, nothing gained.

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mrburnette
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Re: Hello

Post by mrburnette » Tue Jan 09, 2018 2:30 pm

dennyjim wrote:
Tue Jan 09, 2018 1:27 pm
Hi, I've just started with microprocessors. <...>
Welcome!

There was a time a couple of years back when I would have suggested that you turn and run away as fast as you could! At that past time, the STM32F1xx core was not as mature as today and many currently available libraries were not ported. Getting any complex project up and running could be painful.
BUT
Today, much effort by the community go into making the STM32F1xx Arduino core better aligned with official offerings found on Arduino.cc and today the forum has a small but active group of newbies that seem to be getting by without too many hardships.

To make your life easier here, you should be aware that there are some very valuable resources on the web:
- The original documentation from Leaflabs ... the Maple commercial project that lasted only a few years
http://docs.leaflabs.com/docs.leaflabs.com/index.html

- The current STM32F1xx core files for the latest version of ArduinoIDE for clone boards
https://github.com/rogerclarkmelbourne/Arduino_STM32

- The current STM32 core files for official STM Nucleo boards
https://github.com/stm32duino/Arduino_Core_STM32

- WiKi resources
https://github.com/rogerclarkmelbourne/ ... STM32/wiki
and
http://wiki.stm32duino.com/index.php?title=Main_Page

This site (and the Leaflabs site) is fully indexed by Google. So specific info can be located easily as shown below for SPI2

Code: Select all

SPI2 site:stm32duino.com
The above site: search magic also works on the Leaflabs.com site. Most helpful.

You did not provide your formal or hobby education, but beyond being able to locate knowledge using Google, you are also going to need some basic electronic skills, such as Ohm's law. For more complex electronic designs, you may find the following Circuit Simulator useful:
http://www.falstad.com/circuit/

For gathering formulas and other physical information about Electronics or Physics, you may find this site useful:
http://hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu/hbase/hframe.html

Many of our members consider themselves 'advanced' users of uC's and many are involved with microcontrollers as part of their business. So, when posting questions or requesting assistance; please respect these user's time and provide as much information as possible about:
- I am attempting to...
- I based my design off of this/these resources...
- I have referred to this manufacturer document(s)...
- I have attached my full-code-to-date and I am having these specific concerns/issues...
- My computer development environment is: OS, IDE version, library version, library source, etc.

You get the idea... the more you provide, the better the quality of the responses.
Do not forget that when you install the core per the online instructions, you will get many examples. I expect you to review examples and hopefully even bring them up and play a bit. Understanding example code can go a long way to help you acclimate to the STM32duino way of doing things. We do try and keep ourselves "arduino-centric" but sometimes it is necessary to deviate or invent new ways to use functions within the 32-bit ARM architecture that just does not exist in the 8-bit Arduino introductory world.

Several of our members have their own sites which offer a good read, examples, industry experiences, and such. I do not think we as a forum have compiled a definitive list, but I remember this one because I was on it just yesterday:
https://dannyelectronics.wordpress.com/
Maybe some other members will respond with their own sites, too.


Good luck,

Ray
my stuff

dennyjim
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Re: Hello

Post by dennyjim » Wed Jan 10, 2018 5:58 am

Well Thank You Mr. B. I've never had such a concise welcome to a forum before!

I'll do my best to go through all you posted and get a bit more knowledge before diving in.
One thing I will ask straight off the bat... Where do you buy your genuine Arduino parts?
It's a minefield out there with clones.
Sorry I have to rush out (late for work)
Again thanks for all the info and the warm welcome
JIm

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mrburnette
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Re: Hello

Post by mrburnette » Wed Jan 10, 2018 2:52 pm

dennyjim wrote:
Wed Jan 10, 2018 5:58 am
<...>
One thing I will ask straight off the bat... Where do you buy your genuine Arduino parts?
It's a minefield out there with clones.
<...>
Jim,

My philosophy is to have 1 Official UNO and I purchased that board from Adafruit. I have 1 official Mega and I purchased that on sale from CanaKit. Both of these boards are under license from Arduino. I also purchased from Adafruit a Arduino Micro.
The above was done back many years ago when I first started with Arduino. As silly as it may sound, I wanted to have a few of the original boards with the uC's that I was working with (clone) at the time. That is, I had UNO, Mega, and Micro all from China that I used to prototype but I had the original boards that I could fall-back on for sanity testing if I thought there was some hardware issue with the clones.
Truth is, I never found an issue that required me to pull out the original device. I have had issues with clones, mostly soldering problems that can be corrected easily once found. Toward that end, I always buy at least 2 clone boards of the same type these days and keep one for prototyping and one for a hardware safety-net. Crazy things happen with continuous use of clones ... USB sockets connections break bonds and sometimes the regulators on the boards will become hot and repeated use causes solder failures. So, being able to pull out a known working board, upload a sketch, and make a determination if two identical boards are having different issues is very helpful.

With clones, there is an Internet mindset that Arduino is going to go broke because clones are hurting sales. Simply not true because Arduino was founded as an educational hardware provider and much of the Official hardware goes toward education. Clones simply increase the availability of interest and software libraries and published projects.

For new users wanting to get into a well supported uC platform and doing research, the purchase of an Official STM Nucleo board is a decent investment as it is well supported and is well manufactured - not cheap, but a good investment for education. That second or third project however can easily be done economically with a clone board. STM is still selling the silicon :lol:

There is one area of concern about clones ... most are only 2-layer board designs. The original Maple Mini STM32F103 boards were a 4-layer design, that is they had a separate digital ground plane and a separate analog ground plane. These boards were superior for analog projects. However, with the proper bypassing and well-filtered Vcc power designs, the 2-layer clones provide acceptable performance ... but not superior analog performance.

I think the bulk of the STM32duino community purchases clones from AliExpress or eBay. As a forum, we do recommend that you have at least one Maple Mini BAITE clone board... this is our yardstick device. I got mine from:
https://www.aliexpress.com/item/5PCS-LO ... 82373.html
(above not a recommendation for a vendor, but only of the BAITE manufactured clone board.)


Ray

dennyjim
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Re: Hello

Post by dennyjim » Wed Jan 10, 2018 8:14 pm

Hi Ray

I have purchased a load of stuff through Fasttech for building Mods for e-cigs plus various other stuff, but for some reason I have always been averse to buying from Aliexpress, I had the impression that they were wholesalers using small companies to sell in bulk. I've noticed quite a few people on this forum buying via Aliexpress. Maybe time to give them a try.

My end game for the STM32 is to "TRY" and build a drone quadcopter. I got hooked through watching Brokking.net.
I have a little knowledge about electronics and did an HND in computing at age 45. I was a carpenter and had to diversify because of back problems.
My only problem is, I never got into languages other than a bit of html so please excuse me if I stay in the peripherals until I grasp the basic concepts.
All help and advice greatly appreciated
Jim

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mrburnette
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Re: Hello

Post by mrburnette » Thu Jan 11, 2018 12:32 am

Jim,

Quadcopter! Hey, gotta go where your interest takes you.

https://www.google.com/search?q=stm32+q ... quarcopter

I suspect that the STM32F4XX chip with hardware floating point may be the preferred uC, but if anyone has quadcopter experience with STM32F1XX, please chime in.

If you know HTML, you'll manage through C/C++ which is the underlying language for Arduino. Work through the reference & examples.
https://www.arduino.cc/reference/en/
IMO, it is not the language but rather the ability to think logically and make the mental connections from "start" to "finish."

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